Resources for: This One Summer, a YA graphic novel

This One Summer 

Book Information:                                                                                                                  Written by Mariko Tamaki; Illustrated by Jillian Tamaki                                                 Published by First Second, 2014. 319 pp. $17.99 pb. Graphic Novel. Fiction.

ISBN: 9781-596-437746

Awards: 2015 Caldecott Honor, 2015 Printz Honor

Review: This One Summer is a graphic novel and coming of age story about a young girl named Rose, who spends every summer with her parents at their lake house in Awago Beach.  Rose is excited to make it to Awago Beach because she gets to see her friend Windy, who also spends her summers at the beach.  Once Rose and her family get settled in their beach house, she realizes that this summer is different because her parents are constantly bickering, so while the adults are absorbed in their issues Rose and Windy spend a lot of time at a local store where they buy candy and rent R-rated horror films.  Secretly Rose is also checking out Dunc, the teenage store clerk that they nickname Dud.  At times Rose seems very serious in comparison to Windy’s childish behaviors.  Lots of drama unfolds before the girls and things at Awago beach don’t feel the same as they used to.  By the end of the summer at Awago beach, Rose  is a witness to the drama between her parents, and also the drama between Dunc and his girlfriend.  It leaves her and Windy wondering what next summer will be like.  The artwork is really detailed, the illustrator did an amazing job! This book is a good jump starter for teens to engage in discussions about puberty, growing up, sex, and how to cope when parents are having problems.  I recommend this book to children ages 13 and up.  This title would be a good introduction to graphic novels for those that have not yet read one.

Grade level: 8 +                                                                                                                                  

Rating: Highly Recommended                                                                                                                  

Byline: Jaimie Davis, Graduate Student, School Library Science Program, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA.

Teaching Ideas

#Teaching Idea 1: Book or Movie Trailer

9.3 ) Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the
connotation. 9.4 m) Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process. e) Explain the relationships between and among elements of literature: characters, plot, setting, tone, point of view, and theme.

  • Activity: Students will make their own book trailer or movie trailer to introduce the novel using a video tool. Students may select from the following video tools: Animoto, Adobe Spark, Powtoon, Sharalike, Stupeflix, or WeVideo.  If a student has a preference for use of a different video tool, he or she must receive permission from the teacher.  Students will work in groups to create either a book or movie trailer.  For the movie trailer, students will be assigned roles to direct, act, and produce the video.  The trailer must include audio (voice over and music), and scene changes and transitions.  The classroom teacher will collaborate with the librarian to provide students lessons on how to use the web-based video tools to create their video.  The Librarian will give students a tutorial of all the video tools and student groups will determine the best tool for their presentation.  Students are not permitted to depict any violence or act out a violent scene in the trailer.  Students will need to collaborate as a team to produce the final product.  The final products will be presented in the school library computer lab.

#Teaching Idea 2: Become a Character

9.2 The student will produce, analyze, and evaluate auditory, visual, and written media messages. a) Analyze and interpret special effects used in media messages including television, film, and Internet. b) Determine the purpose of the media message and its effect on the audience.

  • Activity: Students will take on the persona of one of the characters from the novel.  Students will use adjectives, character traits, and given an understanding of perspectives and point of view, the students will become one of the characters from the novel.  Acting as the character, students will describe the other characters that the character they are interacts with in the novel.  Students will use the novel, internet resources, and digital tools to work in pairs to compile their lists of character traits using details from the novel to support their character trait selections.  The teacher and librarian can collaborate on this lesson to provide students an overview of character traits, point of view and perspective.  Students will be able to explain their reasons for the traits they selected by citing evidence from the text.  Students should have a minimum of a five minutes monologue or dialogue that they will present to the class to demonstrate their knowledge of the character that they have become from the novel.  The students will also create a 8.5×11 that reflects their character’s traits, and uses the STEAL acronym to show and demonstrate their knowledge of the character.

#Teaching Idea 3: Teen Awareness PSA

SOL 9.4 g) Analyze the cultural or social function of a literary text.  

  • After completing their reading of  This One Summer, Students will work with a partner to identify an example of an issue that effects teens. Examples of issues in society include but are not limited to underage drinking, unprotected sex, teen pregnancy, parental divorce or separation etc.  The teacher and the librarian will collaborate on this lesson to provide students will information about underage drinking, unprotected sex, teen pregnancy, parental divorce or separation etc.  The librarian will have stations with information about the aforementioned teen issues.  The librarian will explain to students that they will use a provided graphic organizer to rotate between the stations to learn about the different .  Students will get an understanding of different teen issues to help them select the specific issue that they will use for this assignment.  Once student groups have information about all the issues, the teacher/and or librarian will assign students a specific issue that they will research and take action against.  Students will return to the library the next day to sit at get more specific research on their topic.  The Librarian will have centers set up for students assigned to the specific injustice to complete more in depth research for their PSA presentation.  Students will chart out an action plan of how to raise awareness for the teen issue. Each plan must answer the following questions: What can you do first? Who might you talk to? Where might you get information? What action might you take?   Students will compile their information to create a Public Service Announcement Commercial.  The librarian will give students a lesson on video tools and how to use them to create their PSA.  The final product will be a student-created PSA.  The librarian will run the PSA’s on the school TV news broadcast.

#Teaching Idea 4: Research Family Types and Family Influence on Society

Family Life 9.2     The student will explain the importance of the family as a basic unit of society and his or her responsibility as a member of the family. Topics include the function of the family, family forms, family strengths, and family influences on society.  The benefits, challenges, responsibilities, and value of marriage for men, women, and children, and communities in society will be included.

  • Students will complete the prewriting activity: Describe your immediate family.

    Who do you live with? Do you have siblings? If so, describe them. Are you close? What activities do you do as a family?

    Students will research the different types of families.  The teacher will collaborate with the librarian to help students research the different types of families.  The librarian may decide to set up stations with pre-searched info for time purposes.  

    Family Vocabulary-

     

    • Family Types
      Family Structure
    • Nuclear Family
    • Single-Parent Family
    • Blended Family
    • Extended Family
    • Adoptive Family
    • Foster Family
    • Resiliency
    • Family Life Cycle
    • Empty Nest
    • Sandwich Generation

Students will answer the following questions after learning about the different types of families: What are the various structures of families? How do families change over the course of the life span?

 

The librarian will show students how to find primary sources and differentiate between primary and secondary sources to search for articles using the school databases.  

Students will search and read two primary source nonfiction articles about family strength and family influence on society and will write a one page paper after researching the different types of families to discuss the importance of families.  Students will explain their responsibility to as a member of  family.

#Teaching Idea 5:Double Entry Response Journal

9.4 b) Make predictions, draw inferences, and connect prior knowledge to support
reading comprehension. d) Analyze the cultural or social function of literature.
e) Identify universal themes prevalent in the literature of different cultures.
f) Examine a literary selection from several critical perspectives.
g) Explain the influence of historical context on the form, style, and point of view of
a literary text.

  • Activity:   Good readers make connections to text as they read, so for this assignment students as students read the novel, they will be required to make at least two-three connection/responses to each chapter.  In the left column, students will record events, situations or quotes from the novel that they can relate or react to.  In the right column, they will record their connections/reactions to make a connection between the text and themselves (text-to self), another text (text-to-text), or the world (text-to-world).  Students may draw pictures to accompany their connections.  Students will also be required to share their reaction to the connection by writing down how it makes them feel and why.  The teacher will model for students how to complete the Double Entry response journal by using the first chapter as an example.  The teacher will use a document camera so that students can see in real-time the teacher’s event, situation, quote, connection, and the reaction to the text connection.

 

Further Explorations

1) Doran, G. (2015, November, 28 ) This One Summer Book Trailer . Retrieved from https://youtu.be/msZMngd5okQ.                            

-The content of this exploration is connected to the curriculum

2) Robinson, J.A. (2010). The Last Song. Touchstone Pictures, Offspring Entertainment.

3) Sonnenfeld, B. (2006). RV [film]. Colombia Pictures 

-This film is about a family that takes a summer trip, which turns out to be a bit dysfunctional.  

4) Sutherland, D. (2014, April 9) How Parental conflict hurts kids. (2014, April 9). Institute for family studies. Retrieved from https://ifstudies.org/blog/how-parental-conflict-hurts-kids.

5) Foster, A. (2015, December, 14) What is family? . Retrieved from youtube https://youtu.be/WyVfaB2nlao  This video is about what makes up a family.  Appropriate content for age and reflects a diverse population.  Would engage learners to learn about family types.

6) New Kids Center. (2016).  Teach about the importance of family.  Retrieved from http://www.newkidscenter.com/values-of-parents.html.   This website is user friendly and discusses how family life contributes to an individual’s overall well-being.

7) Breda Antoniades, C. (2017) Family trips even a teenager will love. Retrieved from http://www.travelchannel.com/interests/family/articles/teens-and-travel   The visuals of this exploration are helpful and the material and information is appropriate with educational significance.  Will show students a reflection of the multicultural and global society.  Students will understand that travel or summer trips provide opportunities to see world beyond their daily life.

Partner Titles

1)D’Abreo, Marie. (2014). Beautiful: A Girl’s Trip Through the Looking Glass. Chicago, IL: Far Out.

A coming-of-age graphic novel about a girl that deals with self-image, self-esteem, and self-acceptance.  This partner title would be of interest to reluctant female readers.

2) Han, J. (2010). It’s Not summer without you (The summer I turned pretty series). New York, NY: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.   

-This novel reveals a different perspective of teenage girl’s summer and how her life and the people around her have changed; people are different and things are different.  This title shows how our experiences shape us as a person.

3) Hicks, F.E. (2015) Friends with Boys. New York, NY: Square Fish.

A graphic novel with a coming-of-age tale with a spooky twist. This partner title would be of interest to reluctant female readers.

4) Myers, W.D. (2015) Monster: a graphic novel. New York, NY: Amistad

This graphic novel is about a teen in a coming-of-age story who is awaiting trial for robbery and murder. This partner title would help students gain an awareness of our pluralistic society and is relevant to today’s world. This graphic novel would be of interest to reluctant male readers.

-This graphic novel would be of interest to reluctant readers.

5) Vivian, S. (2014). Same Difference. New York, NY: Scholastic.

This novel reveals a different perspective of teenage girl’s summer and how her life has changed; people are different and things are different.  This title shows how our experiences shape us as a person.

References

Breda Antoniades, C. (2017) Family trips even a teenager will love. Retrieved from http://www.travelchannel.com/interests/family/articles/teens-and-travel.

D’Abreo, Marie. (2014). Beautiful: A Girl’s Trip Through the Looking Glass. Chicago, IL: Far Out.

Foster, A. (2015, December, 14) What is family . Retrieved from youtube https://youtu.be/WyVfaB2nlao.

Han, J. (2010). It’s Not summer without you (The summer I turned pretty series). New York, NY: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.   

Hicks, F.E. (2015) Friends with Boys. New York, NY: Square Fish.

Myers, W.D. (2015) Monster: a graphic novel. New York, NY: Amistad

New Kids Center. (2016).  Teach about the importance of family.  Retrieved from http://www.newkidscenter.com/values-of-parents.html.

Tamaki, M. (2014). This One Summer. Illus. Jillian Tamaki. New York, NY. First Second.

Vivian, S. (2014). Same Difference. New York, NY: Scholastic.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s