Technology and Maker Exploration

After taking time to explore the technologies that will be featured in the Summer Institute technology exploration session I am equipped with new knowledge and many questions.  I cannot wait to see how these technologies work.

Ozobots are quite interesting and students could use them in the library to learn and create their own code to connect the functions of the robot with the real world.  They could be used in a maker space in the library to introduce students to STEM and programming.

Spheros at first glance to me looks like its about the size of a baseball or tennis ball.  It seems to be a very durable and hardy ball-shaped robot that can withstand the grip of a dog’s jaws, and submersion in water.  Spheros could be synched with an iPad and be coded with different functions and movements.  I think this robot would be a great tool used to teach Physics and Newton’s three laws of motion.  I would have loved to tinker with Spheros when I was a student in high school.

The makey-makey kit is a pretty reasonably priced maker space kit.  The technology of the makey-makey kit is versatile because it allows students to connect regular everyday objects to a computer program.  Additional items are not necessary after purchasing this kit.  This is definitely a hands-on tech space that could be used to collaborate with the science teacher to teach about scientific investigation.

Little Bits is a kit of electronic building blocks, that students can use to invent and code their own creations.  Little bits can be used to teach scientific investigation, and electricity as it relates to circuits and coding.

Google Expeditions seems like a really cool idea.  Teachers can take their students on virtual field trips through the use of the Google Expeditions App and it would be great to have students come in to the library where they could “go on a field trip” to a place after they’ve studied that particular location or concept.

Paper circuits are very simple to create and do not require an elaborate list of materials.  Paper circuits could be used in the library in student-create books, art projects, class assignments and projects, greeting cards, and bulletin boards.

Aurasma is a free application that uses augmented technology to overlay an image or video on to a static image.  Aurasma could be used to have students do an exploratory lesson with the free app on either their phone or an iPad to interact with the image or augmented on the static image.  This could be a lesson to provide students with background knowledge for an objective in any content area.

I am quite familiar with a Green Screen and how it’s used.  I think this would be fun for students to use for the school news in the school library media center.

Students and Teachers could learn how to use Aviary to create their own memes for presentations or posters.

Technology Tasting Questions:

Green Screen Questions: 1- How would I be able to create my own green screen? 2- Is a green screen difficult to use? 3- Do I have to use an iPad or can I use a tablet?

Google Expedition: 1- Is it difficult to use Google Expeditions in the school library as a maker-space? 2- What devices are used inside of the goggles? Does it have to be a cell phone? 3- Is it difficult to have students use their own device for Google Expedition?

Makey-makey: 1- Are there limits to the types of items that the makey-makey can interact with? 2- How does the makey-makey kit interact with a cell phone?  3- Is there an app that needs to be downloaded in order to use makey-makey?

Hopefully I will be able to have my few questions answered once I attend the Summer Institute and interact with these various technologies.

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